Consolidated Consultants announces new Electrical project with Krishi Vigyan Kendra in Baramati

October 3rd, 2013

Pune, India. 3 October, 2013. Consolidated Consultants & Engineers Private Limited (“CCEPL”), a leading Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, HVAC and Renewable energy engineering group based in Pune, Maharashtra, announced the signing of project with Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK), Baramati.

CCEPL shall be providing entire  Electrical services for the esteemed project. Krishi Vigyan Kendra is a district level Farm Science Center spread across 6 acres of land established by the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), New Delhi at Agricultural Development Trust Baramati District Pune for speedy transfer of technology to the farmer’s fields. The entire design and layout is planned by well known architect Mr. Shrikant Anpat from Design Consultants Architect Pvt. Ltd

This lab has various sections such as Administration building, Soil and Water testing Lab, Agriculture Technology Information Center (ATIC), Mobile Soil testing lab, Farmer’s hostel, Nurseries, Greenhouse and Shade House, laboratory for production of Biological products, community Radio station, Meteorological unit, Farm, Plant Health Clinic, Automated Irrigation & Fertigation Unit, Farm Implements’ Costume Hire Centre and Agriculture Market Information Center and 4-5 classrooms where the farmers will be given education and training regarding various modern techniques of cultivating crops, proper use of fertilizers, usage of farm related tool and equipments and various other farming related issues and developments.

CCEPL is honored to work for this huge project. CCEPL brings with it a successful team with extensive experience in managing and building multi-state businesses. “With the most talented and experienced team, we are now accelerating our national expansion into the residential, commercial, industrial markets with very specific and strategic areas in mind” said Mr. VK Jain, Managing Director and Chairman of CCEPL.

About CCEPL: Consolidated Consultants & Engineers Pvt. Ltd (CCEPL), is a multi-disciplined practice providing design and consulting services in Electrical Building Services, Project Managers and Cost Consultants. We are committed to providing a professional service conducted with the highest level of integrity, Professionalism and Trust. Our values drive our approach to conducting business with our clients and business partners as well as the way in which we work and collaborate with each other.
Website: www.consolidatedconsultants.com

Contact:
Mayura Kahane,
Consolidated Consultants & Engineers Pvt. Ltd,
1st Floor – Office No: 5 / 6, Venkateshwara Towers, Katraj, Pune.
Phone No: 91-20-24378704
Site: www.consolidatedconsultants.com
E-mail: contact@consolidatedconsultants.com

Consolidated Consultants Secures High-End Residential Project in Chhattisgarh, India

October 8th, 2012

Pune, India. 9rd October, 2012.  Consolidated Consultants & Engineers Private Limited (“CCEPL”), a leading Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, HVAC and  Renewable energy engineering group based in Pune, Maharashtra secured a High-End Residential Project in Raipur, Chhattisgarh.

The property belongs to one of the leading clients of India, ‘Avinash Group’.  CCEPL shall be providing Electrical, Mechanical and HVAC services to the Client.  The area of the project is approximately 5 lakh sq ft.  The Architect of the Project is Mr. Kiran Nair, the Managing Director of the group ‘Kiran Nair Architects Pvt. Ltd.’, which is also one of the leading architectural group of Pune, Maharashtra.

“We have done many projects with Kiran Nair Architects, such as Khemka, Food Court, Rajpal Homes, Avni Residency, Bajaj House etc.. in Raipur. We are now glad to be associated with another big group like ‘Avinash Group’ builders too. CCEPL has been on a growth path in 2012”, says Mr. V. K. Jain, Chairman, CCEPL.

About CCEPL : Consolidated Consultants & Engineers Pvt. Ltd (CCEPL), is one of the leading companies in the construction business providing design and consultancy services in Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing and HVAC. Established in 1997, the company has offices in Mumbai, Pune, and Los Angeles. CCEPL offers a flexible customised service to meet client’s needs across the business sector, with experience gained in Industrial, Commercial, Airport buildings, Leisure, Hotels, Entertainment Parks, Local authorities, Galleries, Healthcare Estates and Housing, including Satellite Townships.


Contact :

Kaveri Gaikwad,

Consolidated Consultants & Engineers Pvt. Ltd,

1st Floor – Office No : 5 / 6, Venkateshwara Towers, Katraj,Pune.

Phone No : 020-24377222/24378704

Site: www.consolidatedconsultants.com

E-mail : contact@consolidatedconsultants.com

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Consolidated Consultants bags a Hi-tech Automatized Industrial Project in Rajasthan

September 12th, 2012

Pune, India. 12 September, 2012.  Consolidated Consultants & Engineers Private Limited (“CCEPL”), a leading Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, HVAC and  Renewable energy engineering group based in Pune, Maharashtra, signed up an industrial project of 15 acres area, ‘Autoclave Aerated Concrete block (AAC)’ being constructed at Barmer, Rajasthan. CCEPL shall be providing MEP services to this project.


This project is being done in technical collaboration with a large group from China which shall provide the manufacturing facilities to this automatized plant.


“CCEPL is known for its and cost effective designs using state of art technology and that is generating tremendous interest from companies globally. This plant is an alternative to the conventional ones in the construction industry”, says Mr. V. K. Jain, Chairman, CCEPL.


The project is owned by ‘Arihant Superstructures Ltd.’, one of the leading construction companies in Mumbai, India.  Mr. Ashok Chhajer is the Chairman and Managing director of this group. CCEPL has  done many projects with the Arihant Group in the past as part of its partnership.


Apart from the above project, CCEPL has initiated other residential projects with Satish Bhansal, Vivanta Spaces, Choice group and a hospital project in Pen, Maharashtra. “We have a dynamic team working on these projects and delivering it on time”, says Mr. Rahul Pawar, Associate Director, CCEPL.


CCEPL has provided its services to many industrial projects in the past like, Arofine Polymers (Chakan, Pune), Parksons Packaging (pune), K. K. Nag Ltd (Pune), Indo Coconut Industries, MGI Coutier, ENKEI Castalloys Ltd, The Granite Corporation, Maharashtra, Sangam Press Ltd, PPG Ltd, etc.


About CCEPL : Consolidated Consultants & Engineers Pvt. Ltd (CCEPL), is one of the leading companies in the construction business providing design and consultancy services in Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing and HVAC. Established in 1997, the company has offices in Mumbai, Pune, and Los Angeles. CCEPL offers a flexible customised service to meet client’s needs across the business sector, with experience gained in Industrial, Commercial, Airport buildings, Leisure, Hotels, Entertainment Parks, Local authorities, Galleries, Healthcare Estates and Housing, including Satellite Townships.


Contact :

Kaveri Gaikwad,

Consolidated Consultants & Engineers Pvt. Ltd,

1st Floor – Office No : 5 / 6, Venkateshwara Towers, Katraj,Pune.

Phone No : 020-24377222/24378704

Site: www.consolidatedconsultants.com

E-mail : contact@consolidatedconsultants.com

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What is Photovoltaics?

July 6th, 2012

Photovoltaic (PV) materials and devices convert sunlight into electrical energy, and PV cells are commonly known as solar cells. Photovoltaics can literally be translated as light-electricity.

First used in about 1890, “photovoltaic” has two parts: photo, derived from the Greek word for light, and volt, relating to electricity pioneer Alessandro Volta. And this is what photovoltaic materials and devices do—they convert light energy into electrical energy, as French physicist Edmond Becquerel discovered as early as 1839.

Becquerel discovered the process of using sunlight to produce an electric current in a solid material. But it took more than another century to truly understand this process. Scientists eventually learned that the photoelectric or photovoltaic effect caused certain materials to convert light energy into electrical energy at the atomic level.

PV systems are already an important part of our daily lives. Simple PV systems provide power for small consumer items such as calculators and wristwatches. More complicated systems provide power for communications satellites, water pumps, and the lights, appliances, and machines in some homes and workplaces. Many road and traffic signs also are now powered by PV. In many cases, PV power is the least expensive form of electricity for these tasks.

What is the difference between Smart Meters and Smart Grids

April 19th, 2012

At a high level, Smart Meters are a part of Smart Grids.

Smart meters perform the following:
— two-way communications
— recording of interval data on energy usage
— delivery of data to the utility at least daily,
— disconnect switch
— power quality sensing for voltage
— A two-way communications module to talk to smart thermostats, in-home displays, smart appliances and smart equipment in customer homes and businesses.

These features empower consumers with time-based pricing options, such as Peak Time Rebates and Time-of-Use prices, and detailed energy usage, cost, and carbon information, including monthly usage and bill to date. These features also enable utilities to manage better their line voltage and line losses.

On the other hand, Smart Grids start by automating meters and continue with automating the power delivery system. The latter means adding automated sensors and devices on power lines and in substations (the transmission and distribution grid). This automation allows for remote monitoring and control of the grid, more efficient operations, greater reliability through automatic restoration after outages (“self-healing”), and other benefits.

The term “Smart Grid,” also refers to the wires, transformers, and other devices on the power delivery side.

How energy efficient are LEDs?

January 26th, 2012

Two aspects of energy efficiency are important to consider: the efficiency of the LED device itself (source efficacy); and how well the device and fixture work together in providing the necessary lighting (luminaire efficacy). How much electricity is used to provide the intended lighting service depends not only on the LED device, but on the lighting fixture design. Because they are sensitive to thermal and electrical conditions, LEDs must be carefully integrated into lighting fixtures. Poorly designed fixtures using even the best LEDs may be no more efficient than incandescent lighting. Conversely, a well-designed LED-based refrigerated display case light that takes advantage of the directional nature of LEDs may use only about half the total watts of a linear fluorescent system to provide the necessary lighting, even though the LEDs have lower source efficacy than the linear fluorescent lamps. Learn more about luminaire efficacy

Energy performance of white LED products continues to improve rapidly. DOE’s long-term research and development goal calls for white-light LEDs producing 160 lumens per watt in cost-effective, market-ready systems by 2025. This chart shows typical luminous efficacies for traditional and LED sources, including ballast losses as applicable.

How is LED lighting different from other energy-efficient lighting technologies?

January 26th, 2012

LEDs offer the potential for cutting general lighting energy use by one-quarter, saving energy dollars and carbon emissions in the process. Their unique characteristics—including compact size, long life and ease of maintenance, resistance to breakage and vibration, good performance in cold temperatures, lack of infrared or ultraviolet emissions, and instant-on performance—are beneficial in many lighting applications. The ability to provide dimming and color control is another benefit of LED lights.

One of the defining features of LEDs is that they emit light in a specific direction. Since directional lighting reduces the need for reflectors and diffusers that can trap light, well-designed LED fixtures can deliver light efficiently to the intended location. In contrast, fluorescent and “bulb” shaped incandescent lamps emit light in all directions; much of the light produced by the lamp is lost within the fixture, reabsorbed by the lamp, or escapes from the fixture in a direction that is not useful for the intended application. For many fixture types, including recessed downlights, troffers, and undercabinet fixtures, it is not uncommon for 40 to 50% of the total light output of fluorescent and incandescent lamps to be lost before it exits the fixture.

Basics of LED lights

January 26th, 2012

This section summarizes the basics of how LEDs function in general lighting. For more details, see Resources at right. Information on organic LEDs (OLEDs) can be found in the R&D Challenges section of this site.

Unlike incandescent and fluorescent lamps, LEDs are not inherently white light sources. Instead, LEDs emit nearly monochromatic light, making them highly efficient for colored light applications such as traffic lights and exit signs. However, to be used as a general light source, white light is needed. White light can be achieved with LEDs in two main ways:

Phosphor conversion, in which a phosphor is used on or near the LED to emit white light; and
RGB systems, in which light from multiple monochromatic LEDs (red, green, and blue) is mixed, resulting in white light.

The number of white light LED products available on the market continues to grow, with new generations of devices becoming available about every four to six months.

What is the Whole-House Systems Approach?

January 7th, 2012

Designing and constructing an energy-efficient house requires careful planning and attention to details. A whole-house systems approach can help you and your architect develop a successful strategy for incorporating energy efficiency into your home’s design.

A whole-house systems approach considers the interaction between you, your building site, your climate, and these other elements or components of your home:

Appliances and home electronics
Insulation and air sealing
Lighting and daylighting
Space heating and cooling
Water heating
Windows, doors, and skylights.

Builders and designers who use this approach recognize that the features of one component in the house can greatly affect other components, which ultimately affects the overall energy efficiency of the house.

These are some benefits of using a whole-house systems approach:

Reduced utility and maintenance costs
Increased comfort
Reduced noise
A healthier and safer indoor environment
Improved building durability.

You can use the whole-house systems approach with any home design. Using this approach, you also might consider designing a home that generates its own electricity.

Explaining Geo-thermal Energy

January 7th, 2012

Geothermal Energy has been around for as long as the Earth has existed. “Geo” means earth, and “thermal” means heat. So, geothermal means earth-heat.

Have you ever cut a boiled egg in half? The egg is similar to how the earth looks like inside. The yellow yolk of the egg is like the core of the earth. The white part is the mantle of the earth. And the thin shell of the egg, that would have surrounded the boiled egg if you didn’t peel it off, is like the earth’s crust.

Below the crust of the earth, the top layer of the mantle is a hot liquid rock called magma. The crust of the earth floats on this liquid magma mantle. When magma breaks through the surface of the earth in a volcano, it is called lava.
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For every 100 meters you go below ground, the temperature of the rock increases about 3 degrees Celsius. Or for every 328 feet below ground, the temperature increases 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit. So, if you went about 10,000 feet below ground, the temperature of the rock would be hot enough to boil water.

Deep under the surface, water sometimes makes its way close to the hot rock and turns into boiling hot water or into steam. The hot water can reach temperatures of more than 300 degrees Fahrenheit (148 degrees Celsius). This is hotter than boiling water (212 degrees F / 100 degrees C). It doesn’t turn into steam because it is not in contact with the air.
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When this hot water comes up through a crack in the earth, we call it a hot spring. Or, it sometimes explodes into the air as a geyser.

In other places around the world, people used hot springs for rest and relaxation. The ancient Romans built elaborate buildings to enjoy hot baths, and the Japanese have enjoyed natural hot springs for centuries.

Hot water or steam from below ground can also be used to make electricity in a geothermal power plant.

In California, there are 14 areas where geothermal energy is used to make electricity.

Some of the areas have so much steam and hot water that it can be used to generate electricity. Holes are drilled into the ground and pipes lowered into the hot water, like a drinking straw in a soda. The hot steam or water comes up through these pipes from below ground.

A geothermal power plant is like in a regular power plant except that no fuel is burned to heat water into steam. The steam or hot water in a geothermal power plant is heated by the earth. It goes into a special turbine. The turbine blades spin and the shaft from the turbine is connected to a generator to make electricity. The steam then gets cooled off in a cooling tower.

The white “smoke” rising from the plants is steam given off in the cooling process. The cooled water can then be pumped back below ground to be reheated by the earth.

The hot water flows into turbine and out of the turbine. The turn turns the generator, and the electricity goes out to the transformer and then to the huge transmission wires that link the power plants to our homes, school and businesses.